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The new Government help to buy scheme was introduced in April 2013 to help stimulate the housing market by providing loans of up to 20% of the purchase price on a new build home. We know that saving for an adequate deposit can be very hard for first time buyers in the current market so the loan will help to bridge the gap between what you can borrow from a mortgage lender and what you can afford as a deposit.

At what point in the process is it legally binding?

You can withdraw from a sale or purchase up until the point contracts have been exchanged. Any deposits paid after exchange of contract will then by non-refundable. After contracts are exchanged you are then responsible for the property you are buying and should arrange suitable insurance from this date.

How long are local searches valid for?

A local authority search completed for a house purchase is valid for 3 months.

How long does the conveyancing process take on average?

We usually say 4-6 weeks for an average sale or purchase. Queries and concerns can often come out of the local authority searches which need further investigation and sometimes this leads to re-approval from the Mortgage lender. This can add further time into the process.

What happens if we can’t produce certificates for work we’ve had done on the house we’re selling?

You can indemnify the work by taking out an insurance policy. This means that you can not be held liable for any future fault on the work that was done. We can arrange this for you

What is Stamp Duty and how much will I have to pay?

Stamp Duty is a tax levied by HM Government on a transfer of property. For residential property this tax is calculated at 1% for property values between £125,001 and £250,000, 3% for values between £250,001 and £500,000 and 4% for those of £500,001 and over. Duty may also be chargeable on any rental charge (leases only) - this affects both residential and commercial leases where different thresholds are applied.

What is the difference between Joint Tenants and Tenants in Common?

Tenants is Common is where two or more people are entitled to the proceeds of sale in distinct shares - on the death of one, his/her interest will not pass to the survivor(s) but will be part of his/her estate. Joint Tenants are on the other hand 50/50 Co-owners of land - when one of them dies, his/her rights of ownership pass to the survivor(s).

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